miner’s lettuce season

Claytonia in veggie gardenThe veggie garden is ankle- to calf-deep in miner’s lettuce this time of year. It began with a single generous packet of seed a few years ago, and now it comes back reliably–if by “reliably” you mean “with a vengeance.”

Miner's lettuce seedlings coming up in a crack next to the house...
Miner’s lettuce seedlings coming up in a crack next to the house…
It’s spread onto walkways, in cracks of concrete next to the house, even in the scrappy little patch of green that’s left of the much larger lawn. But hey, it’s a California native. It’s edible. It’s pretty.

Miner's Lettuce (Claytonia perfoliata) with mature leaves surround the flowering stems
Miner’s Lettuce (Claytonia perfoliata) with mature leaves surround the flowering stems
It has perfoliate leaves–leaves that when mature can completely encircle the stem, making it appear as if the stem pierced the leaf. And it pulls up easily enough from where you don’t want it. Definitely easy to like.

Profile of the tiny white flowers on miner's lettuce
Profile of the tiny white flowers on miner’s lettuce
If you don’t want it to re-seed, just pull (and eat) the greens by the time they begin to flower. But if you want to encourage the plant’s spread, let a few of the plants bloom, set seed, dry and then crumble the dried plants wherever you want plants next year. It’s not a super-meticulous method of propagation, but it works as long as you don’t cultivate the soil too intensely.

Calflora shows Claytonia perfoliata to inhabit many coastal valley to foothill locations statewide. And there’s a herbarium sample that was collected just down the block from me. It can get by with no added water, but will give you a nice kitchen crop when kept just-moist. Sun exposure: full sun to dappled shade. It’s pretty adaptable and just about the easiest thing to grow.
Claytonia tangle in veggie garden

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